Effect of BMI and binge eating on food reward and energy intake: further evidence for a binge eating subtype of obesity.

August 27, 2013

Source: Obesity Facts, 2013, 6 (4), p. 348-359.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: August, 2013.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study examined the influence of trait binge eating in lean and overweight or obese women on appetite, food reward and energy intake. The findings support the suggestion that is a difference in the groups studied between liking and wanting food and that there are subtypes of binge eating behaviours.

Length of publication: 12 pages.


Impact of weight loss with or without exercise on abdominal fat and insulin resistance in obese individuals: a randomised clinical trial

July 25, 2013

Source: British Journal of Nutrition, 2013, 110 (3), p. 486-492.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: August, 2013.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: Abdominal obesity is known to contribute to the development of insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular disease. This study examined the effects of body weight reduction with and without exercise over abdominal fat tissue and IR. The authors found that 5% weight loss reduced abdominal far and IR in obese individuals but exercise did not add to the effect of weight loss on the outcome variables.

Length of publication: 7 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effects of promoting longer-term and exclusive breastfeeding on adiposity and insulin-like growth factor-I at age 11.5 years: a randomized trial.

March 26, 2013

Source: JAMA, 2013, 309(10), p.1005-1013
Follow this link for abstract.
Date of publication: 13th March, 2013.
Publication type: Research.
In a nutshell: The findings of this study suggest that whilst breast feeding is good for babies, it is unlikely to halt the obesity epidemic in children. The trial tested an intervention to encourage exclusive breast feeding of healthy singleton babies, which worked. However, the additional breast feeding, which was substantial, didn’t prevent overweight or obesity a decade later and made no discernible difference to children’s body mass index.
Length of publication: 9 pages.
Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens. For more information about accessing full text, follow this link to find your local NHS Library


A Trial of Sugar-free or Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Body Weight in Children.

October 8, 2012

Source: New England Journal of Medicine, 2012, epub DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203034

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 21st September, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This randomized trial, conducted over 18 months, saw participants receive either 250ml per day sugar-free, artificially sweetened beverage or a similar sugar-containing beverage. Results showed that masked replacements for sugar-containing beverages with non-calorific beverages reduced weight gain and fat accumulation in the normal weight children participating in this study.

Length of publication: 10 pages.

 


‘It’s not what you eat, it’s when you eat’ claim.

October 8, 2012

Source: NHS Choices

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 14th September, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that the timing of a meal is more important than the actual content.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Effect of diet and exercise, alone or combined, on weight and body composition in overweight-to-obese postmenopausal women.

July 30, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (8), p. 1628-1638.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: August, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: A RCT among 439 overweight-to-obese postmenopausal sedentary women to determine the differing effects of a calorie-reduced, low-fat diet (D), a moderate-intensity, aerobic exercise program (E), or the combination of both interventions (D+E), versus a no-lifestyle-change control group (C) on change in body weight and composition. It was found that amongst this group, lifestyle-change involving diet, exercise, or both over 1 year improved body weight and adiposity, with the greatest change arising from the combined intervention.

Length of publication: 11 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Psychological treatment for obesity: Determining what eating behaviours are involved.

July 3, 2012

 Source: European Food Information Council (EUFIC)

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: June 2012.

Publication type: News Item.

In a nutshell: EUFIC reports on the recent development of a self-reported questionnaire aimed to help researchers to better understand the eating behaviours related to overweight and obesity.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link for the abstract of the original study. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.