Effect of BMI and binge eating on food reward and energy intake: further evidence for a binge eating subtype of obesity.

August 27, 2013

Source: Obesity Facts, 2013, 6 (4), p. 348-359.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: August, 2013.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study examined the influence of trait binge eating in lean and overweight or obese women on appetite, food reward and energy intake. The findings support the suggestion that is a difference in the groups studied between liking and wanting food and that there are subtypes of binge eating behaviours.

Length of publication: 12 pages.

Advertisements

UK women are ‘fattest in Europe’.

December 1, 2011

Source: BBC News

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 26th November, 2011.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: A news report outlining the findings of a recent report which states that the UK has more obese women than any other country in the European Union.   Figures released by the European Commission showed that nearly a quarter (23.9 per cent) of women in theUK were obese in 2008/09, when the data was recorded.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Acknowledgement: To access the report cited in this article, follow this link.


The impact of weight stigma on caloric consumption.

October 27, 2011

Title: The impact of weight stigma on caloric consumption.

Source: Obesity, 19 (10), p. 1957-1962.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: October, 2011.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: A study exploring the influence of exposure to weight stigma and energy intake in normal weight and overweight women.  Findings suggested that in overweight women, exposure to weight stigmatizing material may result in increased caloric consumption and challenged the idea that weight stigma may have a positive, motivating effect upon overweight women.

Length of publication: 6 pages.



Fat, pregnant or both?

September 16, 2011

Title: Fat, pregnant or both?

Source: BBC News

Follow this link  for full text.

Date of publication: 26th August, 2011.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: Pregnancy is said to be a time when women pay more attention to their diet, but many still become overweight during this time.  Bridget Benelam from the British Nutrition Foundation states that there needs to be clearer weight control advice for women during pregnancy, suggesting that NICE guidelines issued last year are not enough.

Length of publication: 1 page.

 Acknowledgement: Follow this link to access the NICE guidance referred to in this article.


Does “eating for two” make mums gain weight?

June 6, 2011

Title: Does “eating for two” make mums gain weight?

Source: NHS Choices.

Follow this link for fulltext.

Date of publication: 18 May 2011.

Publication type: Website.

In a nutshell: This article takes a closer look at the original research behind recent reports that “eating for two” in pregnancy may be linked to an increased risk of life-long obesity for women.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: Click here to read the full text of the original research article.


Defining overweight and obesity in pre-school children: IOTF reference or WHO standard?

March 28, 2011

Source: Obesity Reviews, 2011, 12, (4), p.295-300.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April 2011.

Publication type: Research

In a nutshell: This article examines the performance of the datasets currently used to define overweight and obesity in pre-school children – the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) reference and the WHO standard.  The study highlights discrepancies between the 2 datasets, and suggests further research is needed in relation to the WHO standard to identify BMI cut-offs associated with increased risk of overweight and obesity and associated health outcomes in later life.

Length of publication: 6 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Big breakfasts “bad for diets”.

February 19, 2011

Source: http://www.nursingtimes.net

Follow this link for  full text.

Date of publication: 8th February, 2011.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: Research recently published in Nutrition Journal asserted that greater calorie intake at breakfast was linked to greater overall daily calorie intake in normal weight and obese participants.  This article looks behind the reported headlines to examine more closely the methodology and findings of this study.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Acknowledgement: Follow this link to view the original research article.