New US estimate links obesity to 18% of deaths.

August 27, 2013

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the Headlines

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Date of publication: 16th August, 2013.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that obesity is killing more people than thought.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the full text of the original research discussed in this article.

 

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Childhood obesity may impact on heart health in later life.

October 8, 2012

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: 26th September, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind a recent headline which suggested that obese children are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease as adults.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

 


Willingness to pay for obesity pharmacotherapy.

October 8, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (10), p.2019–2026

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Date of publication: October 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study used an online survey to assess preferences and willingness to pay (WTP) for obesity medications among people seeking weight loss in the United States and United Kingdom. Findings showed that patients were willing to pay £6.51/$10.49 per month per percentage point of weight loss that a pharmacotherapy could provide and placed a high value on weight loss and avoiding changes to their lifestyle, and less value on reducing long-term risks to health.

Length of publication: 8 pages.

 


Childhood obesity: 10 of your stories.

October 8, 2012

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: 2nd October, 2012.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: 10 adults look back on their experiences as overweight children and how this has affected them and shaped their attitudes towards food throughout their lives.

Length of publication: 1 wepbage.

 


Can you really be both ‘fat and fit?’

September 10, 2012

Source: NHS Choices 

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Date of publication: 5th September, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines suggesting that people may be “fat and fit”.

Length of publication: 1 web page.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original research paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome and Functional and Structural Brain Impairments in Adolescence

September 7, 2012

Source: Pediatrics, 2012, doi: 10.1542 (early view)

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Date of publication: 3rd September, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study examines the documented rise in metabolic syndrome in adolescents and its association with obesity. The study found that obese teens who have this syndrome may demonstrate poorer cognitive function, which may be linked to poorer academic performance. The authors suggest that brain function tests should be one of the parameters evaluated when considering treatment of the obese adolescent.

Length of publication: 9 pages


Impact of Physician BMI on Obesity Care and Beliefs.

May 10, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (5), p.999-1005.

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Date of publication: May 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study looked at the impact of physician BMI on obesity care, physician self-efficacy, perceptions of role-modeling weight-related health behaviors, and perceptions of patient trust in weight loss advice. Findings suggested that physicians with a normal BMI were more likely to engage their obese patients in weight loss discussions, and had greater confidence in their ability to act as a role model and provide diet and exercise counseling to overweight patients.

Length of publication: 6 pages.           

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.