Reporting of dietary advice in UK national newspapers found to be unsatisfactory.

June 6, 2011

Title: Reporting of dietary advice in UK national newspapers found to be unsatisfactory.

Source: EUFIC

Follow this link for fulltext.

Date of publication: May 2011.

Publication type: Website.

In a nutshell: A commentary upon a study that examines the standard of reporting of dietary advice in the UK national press and how they may impact upon the dietary and health beliefs and choices of readers.  The study reveals that there is widespread misreporting of dietary health news which could result in misconceptions about food and health.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: The abstract of the original research can be found here.  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Advertisements

Does “eating for two” make mums gain weight?

June 6, 2011

Title: Does “eating for two” make mums gain weight?

Source: NHS Choices.

Follow this link for fulltext.

Date of publication: 18 May 2011.

Publication type: Website.

In a nutshell: This article takes a closer look at the original research behind recent reports that “eating for two” in pregnancy may be linked to an increased risk of life-long obesity for women.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: Click here to read the full text of the original research article.


The lowdown on green gyms.

April 26, 2011

Source: Local Government: Improvement & Development. 

Follow this link for full text. 

Date of publication: 25 April, 2011.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: This article acknowledges that not everyone wants to join a gym to stay fit and healthy.  Instead, it discusses a number of alternative ways that individuals can increase their level of physical activity and keep fit.

Length of publication: 1 page.



Get ready for summer.

April 26, 2011

Source: NHS Choices.

Follow this link for  fulltext. 

Date of publication: April 2011.

Publication type: Website.

In a nutshell: NHS Choices is inviting people to sign up for a set of action packs aimed at improving health and well-being.  The programme includes weekly emails with tips and advice and the opportunity to get a free 5-day gym pass.

Length of publication: 1 page.



Getting the Fitbug.

March 28, 2011

Source: Local Government Improvement and Development.

Follow this link for  fulltext.

Date of publication: March 2011.

Publication type: Website.

In a nutshell: This article looks at user experiences with the Fitbug, an interactive pedometer-like device that not only measures activity but exertion levels.  Data related to user activity can be downloaded to a PC program, where users will find additional support and advice on diet and exercise.  A number of public and private sector organisations have instituted employee well-being programmes, using this device as a means of encouraging positive health behaviours.

Length of publication: 1 page.


How to eat healthily on a budget.

March 26, 2011

Source: EUFIC.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: March 2011.

Publication type: Web site.

In a nutshell: In these economically tough times, people everywhere are trying to make savings on their food bills.  There is a common misconception that all healthy food must be expensive.  This article provides tips and ideas for creative meal planning and home cooking, showing that you can eat healthily on a limited budget.

Length of publication: 1 page.



How do consumers respond to portion information on food and drink labels?

February 18, 2011

Source: EUFIC website.

Follow this link for  full text.

Date of publication: 18 February, 2011.

Publication type: Web page.

In a nutshell: EUFIC, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Surrey, has published the results of its latest European nutrition labelling consumer research.  In a climate of overweight and obesity, the amount consumers eat or drink is just as important as what is eaten. Portion information is often included on food and drink labels but little is known about how consumers interpret and use this information.

This study provides evidence that when portion information is present on pack in addition to per 100g/100ml information, consumers can use it to help them to use nutrition information correctly.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: Listen to the recorded webinar here from 22nd February.