Obesity discrimination: the role of physical appearance, personal ideology, and anti-fat prejudice.

April 18, 2013

Source: International Journal of Obesity, 2013, 37 (3), p. 455-460.
Follow this link for abstract.
Date of publication: March, 2013.
Publication type: Research.
In a nutshell: This study examined whether a recently developed measure of anti-fat prejudice, the universal measure of bias (UMB), along with other correlates of prejudicial attitudes and beliefs predict obesity discrimination. The authors found that obesity discrimination was displayed across all selection criteria.
Length of publication: 6 pages.
Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


PE lessons “put girls off exercise”.

May 10, 2012

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the headlines.

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Date of publication: 3rd May, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: Recent headlines suggested that PE lessons put girls off sport and exercise. NHS Choices took a closer look at the original report which prompted these news stories.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to download the full text of the original report.


The effects of reality television on weight bias: an examination of The Biggest Loser.

May 10, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (5), p.993-998.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: May 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This small study examined the effects weight-loss reality TV shows, such as The Biggest Loser, may have upon weight bias. Levels of weight bias were measured in both control and experiment groups before and after the intervention, as well as participant BMI and personal intentions of weight loss. The results indicated that anti-fat attitudes increase after brief exposure to weight-loss reality television.

Length of publication: 6 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Doctors back denial of treatment for smokers and the obese.

May 10, 2012

 

Source: The Guardian.

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Date of publication: 29th April, 2012.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: This story discusses the controversial results of a survey on Doctors.net.uk which examined “lifestyle rationing” of health services. The survey reported that 54% of respondents felt that the NHS should have the right to withhold non-emergency treatment from patients who are overweight or who refuse to stop smoking. The story includes comment from professional bodies, NHS organisations and private sector groups.

Length of publication: 1 page.


Changes in weight bias following weight loss: the impact of weight-loss method

February 21, 2012

Source: International Journal of Obesity, 2012, 36 (2), p.314–319

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: February, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study examined changes in people’s perceptions of an obese target that had lost weight through diet and exercise or through surgery. The findings indicate that a person’s perceptions of obese individuals can improve after weight loss.

Length of publication: 6 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Medical student bias and care recommendations for an obese vs non-obese virtual patient.

June 6, 2011

Title: Medical student bias and care recommendations for an obese vs non-obese virtual patient.

Source: International Journal of Obesity, 2011, 35 (5) p. 728-735.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: May 2011.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study used an immersive virtual reality environment to look at the effect of a patient’s weight on medical students’ attitudes, beliefs and interpersonal behaviour towards the patient and the clinical recommendations given for care.  Whilst the study revealed biases in attitudes, beliefs and interpersonal behaviour, there was no clear evidence of bias in the clinical recommendations given for patient care.  The authors suggest that a better understanding of the nature and source of weight bias among practitioners may help in the development of strategies to address this issue.

Length of publication: 8 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.