Child obesity: who are you calling fat?

April 18, 2013

Source: BBC News.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 8th March, 2013.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: This article looks at how health care professionals may approach a discussion with parents of a child who is overweight and considers popular opinions on this subject.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

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Effects of promoting longer-term and exclusive breastfeeding on adiposity and insulin-like growth factor-I at age 11.5 years: a randomized trial.

March 26, 2013

Source: JAMA, 2013, 309(10), p.1005-1013
Follow this link for abstract.
Date of publication: 13th March, 2013.
Publication type: Research.
In a nutshell: The findings of this study suggest that whilst breast feeding is good for babies, it is unlikely to halt the obesity epidemic in children. The trial tested an intervention to encourage exclusive breast feeding of healthy singleton babies, which worked. However, the additional breast feeding, which was substantial, didn’t prevent overweight or obesity a decade later and made no discernible difference to children’s body mass index.
Length of publication: 9 pages.
Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens. For more information about accessing full text, follow this link to find your local NHS Library


The association between recreational parks, facilities and childhood obesity: a cross-sectional study of the 2007 National Survey of Children’s Health.

March 26, 2013

Source: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2013, 67 (5), p.427-431.
Follow this link for abstract.
Date of publication: May 2013.
Publication type: Research.
In a nutshell: This cross-sectional study examines the association between access to recreational parks and facilities and obesity. The results highlight potential health disparities in childhood obesity due to limited access to recreational facilities and parks.
Length of publication: 5 pages.
Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Is childcare “making kids chubbier”?

December 13, 2012

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: 20th November, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that children who go to nursery are more likely to be overweight than those cared for by their parents.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Escalating Coverage of Obesity in UK Newspapers: The Evolution and Framing of the “Obesity Epidemic” From 1996 to 2010.

July 30, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (8), p.1688-1695.

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Date of publication: August, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study offers a large-scale examination of the evolution and framing of the obesity epidemic in UK newspapers, identifying shifts in news coverage about causes of and potential solutions to the obesity epidemic over a 15 year period. The authors found an increase in media reporting on obesity, with a particular increase in reporting on childhood obesity, and a shift towards reporting on societal solutions such as regulatory change.

Length of publication: 8 pages.


Interventions for preventing obesity in children

January 9, 2012

Source: The Cochrane Library

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: 7th December, 2011.

Publication type: Review.

In a nutshell: An update on the previous Cochrane review of childhood obesity prevention research, determining the effectiveness of evaluated interventions intended to prevent obesity in children assessed by change in Body Mass Index (BMI). Strong evidence was found to support the beneficial effects of child obesity prevention programmes on BMI, particularly for programmes targeted to children aged six to 12 years. However, a great deal of variation between studies was noted and findings may be biased by missing small studies with negative findings.

Length of publication: 1 web page.

Acknowledgement: Follow this link to read the review in full (214 pages).