The emerging role of dietary fructose in obesity and cognitive decline.

August 27, 2013

Source: Nutrition, 2013, 12:114.

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Date of publication: August, 2013.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: This paper looks initially at the association between a noted increased intake of dietary fructose and obesity, cognitive decline and dementia, then goes on to consider the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to promising results in cognitive function including ameliorating the impact of a high-fructose diet.

Length of publication: 12 pages.

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Just a few extra pounds increases heart failure risk

July 25, 2013

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the headlines.

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Date of publication: 26th June, 2013.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: A closer at the research behind a recent news story which suggested that even a small weight gain could have significant impact upon one’s health.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the full text of the original research paper discussed in this article.


Celebrity chefs can’t be blamed for obesity rates.

May 21, 2013

Source: NHS Choices.

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Date of publication: 24th April, 2013.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that the blame for obesity can be laid on celebrity chefs.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Acknowledgement: Follow this link to access the full text of the original research article discussed.


‘It’s not what you eat, it’s when you eat’ claim.

October 8, 2012

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: 14th September, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that the timing of a meal is more important than the actual content.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Childhood obesity: 10 of your stories.

October 8, 2012

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: 2nd October, 2012.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: 10 adults look back on their experiences as overweight children and how this has affected them and shaped their attitudes towards food throughout their lives.

Length of publication: 1 wepbage.

 


Psychological treatment for obesity: Determining what eating behaviours are involved.

July 3, 2012

 Source: European Food Information Council (EUFIC)

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Date of publication: June 2012.

Publication type: News Item.

In a nutshell: EUFIC reports on the recent development of a self-reported questionnaire aimed to help researchers to better understand the eating behaviours related to overweight and obesity.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link for the abstract of the original study. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Impact of Physician BMI on Obesity Care and Beliefs.

May 10, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (5), p.999-1005.

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Date of publication: May 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study looked at the impact of physician BMI on obesity care, physician self-efficacy, perceptions of role-modeling weight-related health behaviors, and perceptions of patient trust in weight loss advice. Findings suggested that physicians with a normal BMI were more likely to engage their obese patients in weight loss discussions, and had greater confidence in their ability to act as a role model and provide diet and exercise counseling to overweight patients.

Length of publication: 6 pages.           

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.