Celebrity chefs can’t be blamed for obesity rates.

May 21, 2013

Source: NHS Choices.

Follow this link for  full text.

Date of publication: 24th April, 2013.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that the blame for obesity can be laid on celebrity chefs.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Acknowledgement: Follow this link to access the full text of the original research article discussed.

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Escalating Coverage of Obesity in UK Newspapers: The Evolution and Framing of the “Obesity Epidemic” From 1996 to 2010.

July 30, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (8), p.1688-1695.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: August, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study offers a large-scale examination of the evolution and framing of the obesity epidemic in UK newspapers, identifying shifts in news coverage about causes of and potential solutions to the obesity epidemic over a 15 year period. The authors found an increase in media reporting on obesity, with a particular increase in reporting on childhood obesity, and a shift towards reporting on societal solutions such as regulatory change.

Length of publication: 8 pages.


Can you fidget your way to fitness?

July 7, 2011

Title: Can you fidget your way to fitness?

Source: NursingTimes.net

Follow this link for  fulltext.

Date of publication: 3rd July, 2011.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: This article takes a closer look at the original research behind recent newspaper claims that you can fidget your way to fitness to provide a clearer understanding of the findings.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original study.  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.



Junk food adverts should be banned before watershed.

July 7, 2011

Title: Junk food adverts should be banned before watershed.

Source: The Telegraph.

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Date of publication: 7th July 2011.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: This article reports on a recent study by Liverpool University’s Institute of Psychology, Health & Society which examined the food preferences of children in North West England.  The study found that young children are more likely to choose fattening and sugary foods after viewing commercials for unhealthy snacks.  The study suggested that the introduction of a watershed for screening such commercials should be considered.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the original research paper.  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.



Reporting of dietary advice in UK national newspapers found to be unsatisfactory.

June 6, 2011

Title: Reporting of dietary advice in UK national newspapers found to be unsatisfactory.

Source: EUFIC

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Date of publication: May 2011.

Publication type: Website.

In a nutshell: A commentary upon a study that examines the standard of reporting of dietary advice in the UK national press and how they may impact upon the dietary and health beliefs and choices of readers.  The study reveals that there is widespread misreporting of dietary health news which could result in misconceptions about food and health.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: The abstract of the original research can be found here.  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.