The effects of reality television on weight bias: an examination of The Biggest Loser.

May 10, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (5), p.993-998.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: May 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This small study examined the effects weight-loss reality TV shows, such as The Biggest Loser, may have upon weight bias. Levels of weight bias were measured in both control and experiment groups before and after the intervention, as well as participant BMI and personal intentions of weight loss. The results indicated that anti-fat attitudes increase after brief exposure to weight-loss reality television.

Length of publication: 6 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Advertisements

Mouse ‘fat gene’ gives clues on weight gain.

March 30, 2012

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the headlines.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: March, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look behind the recent newspaper headline which suggested that scientists have uncovered a “greedy gene”.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link for the abstract of the original research discuused in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the original article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Preventing and treating childhood obesity: time to target fathers

February 21, 2012

Source: International Journal of Obesity , 2012, 36 (1), p.12-15.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: January, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This prospective longitudinal study looks at the long-term effects of having one overweight or obese parent on child weight status and determine whether these effects vary according to parent sex. The authors found that children with overweight or obese fathers are at a higher risk of becoming obese and suggest that interventions to treat overweight fathers may have a part in preventing or treating obesity in children.

Length of publication: 4 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Selected eating behaviours and excess body weight: a systematic review

February 21, 2012

Source: Obesity Reviews, 2012, 13 (2), pp. 106-135.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: February, 2012.

Publication type: Review.

In a nutshell: This article examined the association between selected eating behaviours and excess weight in the general population through a systematic review. The review found little or inconsistent evidence linking excess weight with the eating behaviours examined, but the authors highlight the difficulty in measuring human behaviours and suggested that future research should utilize a more systematic approach to capture the effects of eating behaviours on body weight.

Length of publication: 30 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A qualitative study on patients’ and physicians’ visions for the future management of overweight or obesity

February 21, 2012

Source: Family Practice, 2012, 29 (1), p. 103-109.

Follow this linkfor abstract.

Date of publication: February, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This qualitative study analyses the views of both patients and physicians in relation to future management of obesity in primary care. It reveals a high level of agreement between these two groups with regard to the communication requirements for successful care and the need for multimodal care concepts in and out of the GP practice.

Length of publication: 7 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The impact of weight stigma on caloric consumption.

October 27, 2011

Title: The impact of weight stigma on caloric consumption.

Source: Obesity, 19 (10), p. 1957-1962.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: October, 2011.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: A study exploring the influence of exposure to weight stigma and energy intake in normal weight and overweight women.  Findings suggested that in overweight women, exposure to weight stigmatizing material may result in increased caloric consumption and challenged the idea that weight stigma may have a positive, motivating effect upon overweight women.

Length of publication: 6 pages.