Just a few extra pounds increases heart failure risk

July 25, 2013

Source: NHS Choices: Behind the headlines.

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Date of publication: 26th June, 2013.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: A closer at the research behind a recent news story which suggested that even a small weight gain could have significant impact upon one’s health.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the full text of the original research paper discussed in this article.

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Fatness in older women ‘may not be their fault’.

February 6, 2013

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines
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Date of publication: 7th January, 2013.
Publication type: News item.
In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that weight gain in older females “may not be their fault”.
Length of publication: 1 web page.
Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS library.


Physical activity and weight gain prevention in older men.

October 8, 2012

Source: International Journal of Obesity, 2012,  36, p.1165-1169.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: September, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study examined the associations between differing amounts of physical activity with weight gain prevention in older men. Physical activity levels were measured against the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and US federal guidelines. The study found that men who had lower levels of physical activity were more likely to gain weight than men satisfying the 2002 IOM guidelines of >21 MET-h per week (~60 min day−1 of moderate-intensity physical activity).

Length of publication: 5 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


A Trial of Sugar-free or Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Body Weight in Children.

October 8, 2012

Source: New England Journal of Medicine, 2012, epub DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203034

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Date of publication: 21st September, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This randomized trial, conducted over 18 months, saw participants receive either 250ml per day sugar-free, artificially sweetened beverage or a similar sugar-containing beverage. Results showed that masked replacements for sugar-containing beverages with non-calorific beverages reduced weight gain and fat accumulation in the normal weight children participating in this study.

Length of publication: 10 pages.

 


Effects of interventions in pregnancy on maternal weight and obstetric outcomes: meta-analysis of randomised evidence.

July 3, 2012

Source: BMJ, 2012, 344, e2088.

 Follow this link for full text.

 Date of publication: 17th May, 2012.

 Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This is a meta-analysis of 44 RCTs  related to the effects of interventions in pregnancy on maternal weight and obstetric outcomes found that lifestyle and dietary interventions in pregnancy can reduce maternal gestational weight gain, but noted that there was no significant overall effect on outcomes related to foetal weight.

 Length of publication: 15 pages.


Selected eating behaviours and excess body weight: a systematic review

February 21, 2012

Source: Obesity Reviews, 2012, 13 (2), pp. 106-135.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: February, 2012.

Publication type: Review.

In a nutshell: This article examined the association between selected eating behaviours and excess weight in the general population through a systematic review. The review found little or inconsistent evidence linking excess weight with the eating behaviours examined, but the authors highlight the difficulty in measuring human behaviours and suggested that future research should utilize a more systematic approach to capture the effects of eating behaviours on body weight.

Length of publication: 30 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.