Does the 5:2 intermittent fasting diet work?

February 8, 2013

Source: NursingTimes.Net
Follow this link for full text.
Date of publication: 20th January, 2013.
Publication type: Journal article.
In a nutshell: An examination of the 5:2 intermittent fasting diet which has recently gained popularity.
Length of publication: 1 web page.


Twitter diet? Tweeting can ‘aid weight loss’.

February 8, 2013

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines
Follow this link for full text.
Date of publication:
16th January, 2013.
Publication type: News item.
In a nutshell: A closer look behind recent news stories that using social media sites to “tweet” about your diet can aid weight loss.
Length of publication: 1 webpage.
Some important notes: Follow this link to read the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A Trial of Sugar-free or Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Body Weight in Children.

October 8, 2012

Source: New England Journal of Medicine, 2012, epub DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1203034

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 21st September, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This randomized trial, conducted over 18 months, saw participants receive either 250ml per day sugar-free, artificially sweetened beverage or a similar sugar-containing beverage. Results showed that masked replacements for sugar-containing beverages with non-calorific beverages reduced weight gain and fat accumulation in the normal weight children participating in this study.

Length of publication: 10 pages.

 


‘It’s not what you eat, it’s when you eat’ claim.

October 8, 2012

Source: NHS Choices

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: 14th September, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look at the research behind recent headlines which suggested that the timing of a meal is more important than the actual content.

Length of publication: 1 webpage.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


‘Yo-yo’ diets ‘not a no-no’.

September 10, 2012

Source: NHS Choices.

Follow this link for  full text.

Date of publication: 16th August, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look behind recent headlines which stated that yo-yo dieting is not bad for you and will not affect long-term weight loss.

Length of publication: 1 web page.

Some important notes: Follow this link to read the abstract of the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

 


Effect of diet and exercise, alone or combined, on weight and body composition in overweight-to-obese postmenopausal women.

July 30, 2012

Source: Obesity, 2012, 20 (8), p. 1628-1638.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: August, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: A RCT among 439 overweight-to-obese postmenopausal sedentary women to determine the differing effects of a calorie-reduced, low-fat diet (D), a moderate-intensity, aerobic exercise program (E), or the combination of both interventions (D+E), versus a no-lifestyle-change control group (C) on change in body weight and composition. It was found that amongst this group, lifestyle-change involving diet, exercise, or both over 1 year improved body weight and adiposity, with the greatest change arising from the combined intervention.

Length of publication: 11 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Eating out of home and its association with dietary intake: a systematic review of the evidence.

March 30, 2012

Source: Obesity Reviews, 2012, 13 (4), p.329-346.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April 2012.

Publication type: Systematic review.

In a nutshell:  This systematic review of peer-reviewed studies found that eating out of home was associated with a greater total intake of both fat and energy as well as a lower micronutrient intake.

Length of publication: 18 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.