Effect of BMI and binge eating on food reward and energy intake: further evidence for a binge eating subtype of obesity.

August 27, 2013

Source: Obesity Facts, 2013, 6 (4), p. 348-359.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: August, 2013.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study examined the influence of trait binge eating in lean and overweight or obese women on appetite, food reward and energy intake. The findings support the suggestion that is a difference in the groups studied between liking and wanting food and that there are subtypes of binge eating behaviours.

Length of publication: 12 pages.

Advertisements

The emerging role of dietary fructose in obesity and cognitive decline.

August 27, 2013

Source: Nutrition, 2013, 12:114.

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: August, 2013.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: This paper looks initially at the association between a noted increased intake of dietary fructose and obesity, cognitive decline and dementia, then goes on to consider the beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to promising results in cognitive function including ameliorating the impact of a high-fructose diet.

Length of publication: 12 pages.


Weight change, psychological well-being, and vitality in adults participating in a cognitive–behavioral weight loss program.

May 21, 2013

Source: Health Psychology, 2013,  32(4), p. 439-446.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April, 2013.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study examined the impact of intentional weight loss on the psychological well-being of adults participating in three clinical weight loss interventions. The authors found that weight loss was associated with positive changes in psychological well-being , with increased vitality cited as the most significant change.

Length of publication: 8 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient-reported outcomes in bariatric surgery: a systematic review of standards of reporting.

May 21, 2013

Source: Obesity Reviews, 2013, DOI: 10.1111/obr.12041 (early view).

Follow this link for  abstract.

Date of publication: 3rd may, 2013.

Publication type: Systematic review.

In a nutshell: This systematic review examined bariatric surgery studies that used validated patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures. It found that whilst many studies used PRO measures, study design and reporting was poor and the authors suggested that more well-designed studies that include agreed PRO measures are needed to better  inform practice.

Length of publication: Not stated.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Women’s experiences of body image and weight loss after childbirth.

February 8, 2013

Source: British Journal of Midwifery, 20 (12), p.860-865.
Follow this link for abstract.
Date of publication: 5th December, 2012.
Publication type: Research.
In a nutshell: This study examines women’s experiences of body image and weight loss after childbirth, with particular reference to the portrayal of celebrities in media images. Whilst weight loss was not an apparent concern for the women interviewed, there was acknowledgement of possible pressure and unrealistic comparisons with celebrities for new mothers.
Length of publication: 6 pages.
Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Twitter diet? Tweeting can ‘aid weight loss’.

February 8, 2013

Source: NHS Choices – Behind the Headlines
Follow this link for full text.
Date of publication:
16th January, 2013.
Publication type: News item.
In a nutshell: A closer look behind recent news stories that using social media sites to “tweet” about your diet can aid weight loss.
Length of publication: 1 webpage.
Some important notes: Follow this link to read the paper discussed in this article. Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The effect of obesity on polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

February 8, 2013

Source: Obesity Reviews, 2013, 14 (2), p.95-109.
Follow this link for abstract.
Date of publication: February, 2013.
Publication type: Review.
In a nutshell: This review paper aimed to assess the effects of overweight, obesity and central obesity on the reproductive, metabolic and psychological features of PCOS. Obesity significantly worsened all metabolic and reproductive outcomes measured, except for hirsutism, when compared to normal weight women with PCOS. However, overweight women had no differences in total testosterone, hirsutism, total-cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol compared to normal weight women and no differences in SHBG and total testosterone compared to obese women. The authors suggest that prevention and treatment of obesity is important in the management of PCOS.
Length of publication: 15 pages.
Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.