Spoon-feeding compared with ‘baby-led’ weaning

February 21, 2012

Source: NHS Choices

Follow this link for full text.

Date of publication: February, 2012.

Publication type: Journal article.

In a nutshell: A closer look behind recent headlines which suggested that spoon-fed babies could be more prone to obesity than those who had experienced “baby-led” weaning.

Length of publication: Web page.

Acknowledgement: Follow this link to read the full text of the original research examined in this article.


Preventing and treating childhood obesity: time to target fathers

February 21, 2012

Source: International Journal of Obesity , 2012, 36 (1), p.12-15.

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Date of publication: January, 2012.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This prospective longitudinal study looks at the long-term effects of having one overweight or obese parent on child weight status and determine whether these effects vary according to parent sex. The authors found that children with overweight or obese fathers are at a higher risk of becoming obese and suggest that interventions to treat overweight fathers may have a part in preventing or treating obesity in children.

Length of publication: 4 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Families fit for life, Knowsley.

September 12, 2011

Title: Families fit for life, Knowsley.

Source: Local Government Improvement and Development

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Date of publication: 7th September, 2011.

Publication type: News item.

In a nutshell: A look back over a health and fitness programme aimed at  families living in the Knowsley area who experience difficulties and and have children under 5 years of age .  It consists of a mixture of group sessions and home-based support aimed at improving the physical and mental well-being of these families.  The project is due to run until 2012.

Length of publication: 1 page.

 


Parental perceptions of weight status in children: the Gateshead Millennium Study.

August 15, 2011

Title: Parental perceptions of weight status in children: the Gateshead Millennium Study.

Source: International Journal of Obesity, 2011, 35, p. 953-962.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: July, 2011.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: A qualitative study to examine parents’ perceptions of weight status in children and explore parental understanding and attitudes of the issues surrounding overweight and obesity in children.

Length of publication: 10 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The Really Big Summer Adventure.

June 6, 2011

Title: The Really Big Summer Adventure.

Source: Change4Life

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Date of publication: May 2011.

Publication type: Press release.

In a nutshell: Change4Life recently announced its Really Big Summer Adventure campaign will start in July.  Aimed at children, this initiative includes an activity pack with healthy recipes and energetic play ideas in a bid to encourage increased physical activity and healthier eating.

Length of publication: 1 page.


 


Does “eating for two” make mums gain weight?

June 6, 2011

Title: Does “eating for two” make mums gain weight?

Source: NHS Choices.

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Date of publication: 18 May 2011.

Publication type: Website.

In a nutshell: This article takes a closer look at the original research behind recent reports that “eating for two” in pregnancy may be linked to an increased risk of life-long obesity for women.

Length of publication: 1 page.

Some important notes: Click here to read the full text of the original research article.


Tackling childhood overweight: treating parents exclusively is effective.

April 26, 2011

Source: International Journal of Obesity, 2011, 35, p. 501-509.

Follow this link for abstract.

Date of publication: April 2011.

Publication type: Research.

In a nutshell: This study focused on treatment aimed at the parents of overweight or obese children, using a “waiting-list” control group and a cognitive-behavioural treatment group.  The research found that whilst BMI was reduced only in children and parents in the treatment group, both groups displayed positive psychological effects related to taking part in the study.

Length of publication: 9 pages.

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.